AU Healthy Schoolhouse 2.0 PD Session 2 – Nutrients

AU Healthy Schoolhouse 2.0 PD Session 2 – Nutrients


Hello and thank you for joining us for
this professional development session in support of Healthy Schoolhouse 2.0. This
is the second training in our series so if you missed the first one on MyPlate
be sure to go back and watch that one as well. These online professional
development sessions are being offered on demand courtesy of American
University’s Department of Health Studies. We hope they are a quick way to
share nutrition education concepts that you can easily implement in your
kindergarten through grade five classrooms in fifteen to twenty minutes.
Even better once you record that you taught one lesson you’ll receive a
certificate for one hour of continuing education.
If you’ve already taught a lesson, be sure you have recorded it on the Healthy
Schoolhouse professional development web page. The URL is on this slide. Once
you’ve recorded that you taught three lessons, you’ll learn a $75 gift card for
classroom supplies. So let’s get started with today’s training. In the next 15
minutes, we will cover a brief introduction of the Healthy Schoolhouse
2.0 project led by American University. A warm-up on the topic of nutrients with a
game of clues about “Who am I?” Next we’ll review why our bodies need
fuel. And then we’ll get to know the nutrients so we all understand what we
need to eat each day to feel good and fuel our bodies so they run at their
best. Lastly will challenge you to track your own activity each week to see how
you are moving your body. Our goal is for you to feel much more comfortable
talking about nutrients and activity with your students once you’ve brought
them both into focus in your life. Healthy Schoolhouse 2.0 is a five-year
project funded by USDA’s National Institute on Food and Agriculture. The
goal of this project is to improve health literacy and prevent obesity in
elementary school students in Washington DC. To achieve this goal the program team
designs, implements, and evaluates a set of research, education, and extension
activities. The education component is what these online professional
development sessions is all about. We will be covering the content
from each of three lessons from the USDA’s Serving Up MyPlate: A Yummy
Curriculum. Our goal is that you then teach this information to your students.
The research component relates to how we are measuring the impact of our work. At
schools participating in Healthy Schoolhouse 2.0, we are collecting
baseline and follow-up data each school year from both teachers and students in
grades 1-5. We are also measuring consumption of
fruits and vegetables in the cafeteria at lunchtime. The extension component is
the work we do outside of the classroom by supporting Martha’s Table Joyful Food
Markets to help the lessons and content take on real world relevance for the
students. You may be wondering what we have learned from Healthy Schoolhouse
2.0 so far. For teachers we offer a survey twice per year at the beginning
and end of each school year. From this survey we determine two things. The first
is a health education belief score. The health education belief score describes
whether teachers believe that nutrition education in the classroom is important.
The scale is from one (low importance) to five (highest importance). In the first
two years of Healthy Schoolhouse 2.0, the health education belief score for both
the intervention and control schools were similar, with an average health
belief score over four. The second teacher data point is a self-efficacy score.
Again, these data are collected at the beginning and end of the school year.
Teachers report their perception of their own ability to incorporate
nutrition education into the class curricula. The scale is from one (very
little) to five (very much). Initially the self-efficacy scores slightly decreased
for the intervention school and slightly increased for the control school, though
not statistically significant. At the end of the school year the self-efficacy
score had increased for both schools with a larger increase for the
intervention schools, from 4 to 4.41 points. For the students, we also administer a
survey at the beginning and end of each school year. From this survey we
determine two things. The first is a student attitude score which reflects
student attitudes towards healthy eating (vegetables and fruits) and interest in
healthy activities. This graph displays attitude scores for grades 1-5 combined. In the first two years of this project, the intervention school
shows moderate gains at the end of each year. In particular, at the end of the
second year, students at the intervention school reported an average increase of
3.8% in attitude scores and differences in the control school were
not statistically significant. The second student data point is student knowledge.
The student knowledge score reports on the student’s knowledge of healthy food
and the different nutrients that make up a healthy and balanced diet. Again this
graph displays knowledge scores for grades 1-5 combined. At the
pre-test, the intervention school students scored similar in knowledge to the
control school students. But at the post-test the students in our
intervention schools show, on average, a higher knowledge score increase than
students in our control school. So there’s a quick summary of what the
intervention project has shown so far among teachers and students and we’re
excited to see the results going forward. Alright let’s have a little appetizer
on the topic of nutrients. Over the next six slides we will give you some clues
about the nutrients that make certain foods superheroes. We’ll ask you to guess
which foods we are describing. So let’s see which nutrients you are already
familiar with. Number one: I am a vegetable that comes in many colors. I am
high in vitamin C and I help your body fight off colds.
I am delicious served with hummus, and in soups and stir frys. Who am I?
Oranges, Bell Peppers, Cauliflower The answer is Bell peppers. Did you know
that bell peppers are one of the vegetables with the highest amounts of
vitamin C per serving? Just one serving of yellow peppers can give you over a
hundred fifty percent of your daily vitamin C needs. Vitamin C is an
important nutrient in boosting your immune system. I like to eat bell peppers
as a mid-afternoon snack with hummus. Number two: I am high in fiber and minerals. I
help your brain function with my omega-3 fatty acids.
I am tasty as an afternoon snack, on salads, and, with oatmeal and yogurt. Who
am I? Walnuts, Avocados, Apples. The answer is walnuts.
Walnuts are known as a “superfood.” They are high in antioxidants and omega-3
fatty acids to help your brain function better. They are a healthy source of fat,
and high in protein and fiber to keep you fuller for longer. Number three: I am
a fruit that is highest in antioxidants. I help your body to decrease
inflammation and may protect against cancer. Who am I?
Peaches, Blueberries, Pears The answer is blueberries. Blueberries
are one of the fruits with the highest antioxidant profiles. Eating blueberries
regularly helps to fight inflammation and reduced damage done to cells. I like
to throw some blueberries into a smoothie or eat a handful of them with
my breakfast. How’d you do with those clues? Now you know some of the foods
that give us superpowers and that is a game you can also do with your students.
Check out this two-minute video from CHI Health Clinic about superfoods and
all their benefits! Alright, now let’s jump into the first course on feeding
our body the fuel it needs to be strong and healthy. Why do our bodies need fuel?
Everything we do requires energy. We usually think of hard activities like
running or playing sports as using energy, but just lying in bed, digesting
our food, and blinking our eyes requires fuel. When we think of fuel, we’re likely
to think of machines – like cars, airplanes, or rockets – using gasoline. But our bodies
also need fuel. We get fuel from the food we eat. How does food serve as fuel? Food is made up of nutrients and provides calories. Nutrients and calories give us
the energy to think, breathe, move our bodies, and do everything we need to do
in a day. I’m sure you’ve had the experience of suddenly getting tired and
yawning a few times. Then you realize you haven’t eaten in hours. That is your gas
tank telling you it needs more fuel. What kind of fuel do different foods
provide? The food we eat fuels every action our body makes. Different types of
food provide energy in different ways. We will go into more detail in the next
section on exactly what nutrients different foods provide. But while we are
on the topic of fueling our bodies to be able to do everything we need to do in a
day, it’s a good time to mention the importance of being active. Our bodies
are amazing and can move in so many different ways – from salsa dancing to
jumping rope or bicycling and throwing a football. Being active helps our bodies
and our minds. Our muscles and bones grow stronger by being active, our heart and
lungs get stronger, our mood improves, we have more energy, and exercise can
prevent certain types of cancer as well as diabetes, heart disease, and asthma. We
even sleep better! The food we put into our bodies is important, it gives us the
energy to be active and strong. And moving your body regularly is just as
important as the foods you eat. There are many ways to be active. The goal is to
find activities that you enjoy doing because then you are more likely to make
it part of your daily routine. The National Physical Activity Guidelines
recommend being active for at least 150 minutes every week. Some people may think about physical activity and exercise differently. Physical activity is anytime
you move your body. examples of physical activity include
yardwork like gardening, mowing the lawn and raking leaves. House chores like
vacuuming and mopping your floors also count as physical activity. Even taking the
stairs instead of the elevator a few times each day or parking further from
your office or the grocery store counts as activity. It’s important to
stand up and move around throughout the day. Exercise is usually a planned
activity like- meeting a group of friends for basketball, going to a Zumba class, or
a morning run. One is not better than the other. If you build enough physical
activity into your day then you may not have to plan specific times to exercise.
But remember, 150 minutes is the goal. Try to move more and sit less. A few more
details on exercise and physical activity to know there are four broad
categories of exercise and all are important. And they are not mutually
exclusive, meaning the categories can overlap. When we talked about a goal of
at least 150 minutes per week that is referring to aerobic exercise. Aerobic
exercise uses oxygen. These are the activities where our breathing is faster
and our heart rate increases, like walking up a hill, running after a soccer ball
and playing tag. Strength and resistance activities are training our muscles and
making our bones stronger. Activities where we are working against any form of
resistance like weights, water or an exercise band are building strength. This includes things like squatting, push-ups, carrying groceries, and carrying
a child on your back. Flexibility is all about keeping our range of motion. Stretching our muscles keeps them from getting tight. Tight muscles are more
likely to get injured. We want to keep our muscles long and reduce our risk of
injury. Stretching at least a few times a week is ideal. Finally, balance. Having
good balance keeps us steady on our feet and less likely to fall. Being able to
stand on one foot and recover from a misstep will keep you safe.
As we said all forms of exercise are valuable and important and you can find
ways to do them as part of your day. Balance on one foot while
brushing your teeth, stretch while you are watching your favorite TV show, take
the stairs a few times each day or walk on your lunch break, and do lunges or
squats while you are copying papers at the copy machine. So now we’ve talked about why our body needs fuel to think, breathe, walk, run and sleep. So what’s the best fuel? Now we’re going to share everything you need to know about
nutrients. Don’t worry we’re gonna break it down. So this graphic shows the
essential nutrients. There are six classes of nutrients – carbohydrates, fat,
water, protein, and vitamins and minerals. We will focus on new nutrients that give
us calories to keep our bodies healthy and moving. Those nutrients are
carbohydrates, fats, and protein. Water, vitamins and minerals are very important
for maintaining health; however, for students in elementary school we suggest
focusing on the three energy giving nutrients and what they do. Carbohydrates.
They are sugars starches and fibers found in fruits, grains, vegetables and
milk products. They primarily provide fuel or calories to our body. Some
carbohydrate-rich foods have added sugar and fat, such as cookies, muffins, and
donuts. For health, our goal is to eat carbohydrates as close to their natural
state as possible. That might mean an apple versus the apple pie. The more
processed it is, the less nutrition it provides. Carbohydrate-rich foods should
be consumed every day in every meal. Fats are another nutrient that gives our
body’s calories. Fats support cell growth and protect our organs. Fats can be plant- based such as nuts and avocados and also can be found in
protein foods such as chicken, fish, pork and eggs. A fat-free diet is not
necessarily a healthy diet. We all need small amounts of fats in our
diet. But fat is calorically dense, meaning a small amount of fat such as a
teaspoon of oil or butter has 45 calories. So less is more when it comes
to fat. Protein. Our last nutrient that gives us calories is protein. Proteins
help our bodies build and repair tissues, and a variety of foods gives us
proteins. I like to say there are animal-based proteins such as beef,
chicken, pork or fish and there are plant-based proteins such as legumes
(peas or beans), nuts and tofu. Proteins can also be found in dairy products such as
milk and cheese, as well as eggs. This healthy eating plate now connects the
nutrients that we’ve just discussed to the MyPlate graphic you were introduced
to in the Professional Development Program number one. The thing to remember is that by eating a variety of foods we can be sure we will be getting all the
needed nutrients. Now that we’ve shared this brief
overview of nutrients, you can go in to me even more detail by watching this
short three-minute video. You might even share this with students in fourth or
fifth grade. Enjoy! Now we’re asking you to put what you learned about nutrients
and fueling your body right into practice with this make it real challenge – let’s
get moving. For the next two weeks, let’s see how active you are. If you have a
smartphone, SmartWatch or Fitbit, tracking your activity is built right into the
device. If you prefer to go by minutes, see how many days you actually get up
and get moving for ten minutes at a time. The
goal is 150 minutes per week. You don’t have to aim to do it all. Anything that
gets your heart rate up and makes you breathe faster counts as exercise. If you
already know how active you are on a weekly basis, can you fit ten more
minutes into one day? Can you get a little bit more walking in today? Thanks
for spending this time with us to understand concepts around nutrients, how to fuel our bodies and minds, and how to get all the nutrients we need. Now that
you’ve watched this training, don’t forget to teach the lesson to your
students so they understand the importance of nutrients too. And once
you’ve taught that lesson record it on our form. The link is on our Healthy
Schools webpage. After teaching three lessons, you’ll earn $75 in classroom
supplies. On behalf of American University’s Department of Health
Studies, thank you so much and we’ll see you next time.

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