Center for Health Promotion & Prevention Research University of Texas, School of Public Health

Center for Health Promotion & Prevention Research University of Texas, School of Public Health


♪ [MUSIC] ♪ MARIA FERNANDEZ: Despite of
a lot great work that’s been done over the years, there are disparities in
health that still exist and are causing undue
suffering and problems for minorities and other
underserved groups. It’s really important to
learn about disparities, document them, try to understand
the fundamental causes. Most importantly
is addressing them. And that’s one of the
things that we do here at the Center for
Health Promotion. CHRISTINE MARKHAM: We
take that information and we develop multilevel
interventions to focus on helping the individual
change their behavior, helping the community be
more in health promoting and changing the environment
to which these individuals live so we can have better
health outcomes. MARIA FERNANDEZ: We don’t
just sit in our offices and think up interventions, we
really work with the community on a day to day basis. And it’s only with this
kind of partnership, I think that we can
have lasting impact. ♪ [MUSIC] ♪ Over 12 years ago we developed
a network of communities academic partners and primary
care partners to work on cancer control efforts and with
the goal of accelerating the use of evidence based
cancer control in communities. RUTH ARYA: My name is Ruth Arya
and I’m the research coordinator for the C-part 2-1-1 program. DAVID JOBE: Since 2009,
we’ve been in a collaboration with the University of Texas and
the Center for Health Promotion. And it’s sort of a unique
Partnership in that it’s blending an academic
approach with a community service and so 2-1-1 is able
to use evidence based practice on real call situations. RUTH ARYA: They call like normal
to get assistance for services. For example, to pay
utility bills or something and at the end of the call, when they have been assisted
by the I N R specialist they’re asked to do a survey
with some questions about their health. And based on that we can assess
their risks for certain types of cancer, they’re then provided
with a navigator that will assist them through the phone to
obtain the services they need. DIANA GALVAN: What we try to
do is to educate the client about the different cancers and
the particular screenings that are available to them. And we encourage them, try to
empower them so that they can be more proactive about their
health and we help set goals with them. At the very end, when we have
them go through the screening, and you know some of them have
found out that they actually have cancer, and they call
and they’re just so thankful that you were able to help
them with that information. And it just makes you feel
really good about You know, still being able to help this
client with their resources. RUTH ARYA: Not only are they
provided to screen themselves, they’re also given the
knowledge about the screenings and how to prepare for them
so they can help themselves in the future and also friends,
relatives anyone else. So I think it does
have a wide reach. ♪ [MUSIC] ♪ CHRISTINE MARKHAM: Many
of the research projects that we have here at the
center are school based. And schools are just a great
environment to, you know, really reach children and
adolescents and their families. KIMBERLY A. JOHNSON-BAKER:
Sunnyside, Houston Texas is one of the oldest
African American communities in the Houston area. Sunnyside has a very
high teen birth rate. The We Can Do More initiative
is to prevent teen pregnancy. We know that we need to do
more than just focus on teen pregnancy. We need to focus on
education in the community, and so with funding from a
local foundation we were able to facilitate a school
based health center, in a high school for
actually educating on sex, love and healthy relationships
and contraception as well. STEPHANIE GRIGGS: More students
are coming in asking about contraceptives along
with the parents. And to have it readily available
for students, if they need it. KIMBERLY A. JOHNSON-BAKER: We’ve
seen the teen pregnancy rate itself decline in the school and
so that is a huge success for us in what we’re doing. CHRISTINE MARKHAM: In the past
five years alone we’ve had 170 research projects that
have impacted healthier lives, healthier communities locally,
nationally and internationally. We like to say that we
are outsmarting disease. ♪ [MUSIC] ♪ ROSS SHEGOG: We are ready
and able to apply technology to reach our full potential. MARIA FERNANDEZ: Some of the
ways that we use technology is to make learning fun. And also to make it easy for
people who may not necessarily be able to read or have some
limitations in health literacy. And so we have programs for
example that help parents understand the importance of
vaccinating their children against HPV and we also have
programs that work with kids that have asthma, epilepsy
and on sexual health. ♪ [MUSIC] ♪ ROSS SHEGOG: Vitro game
is a hybrid program and the program is designed
to delay the initiation of sex amongst middle school students. So we designed a curriculum that
it was a little bit more modern. Life is a game…. There must be rules… Keeping it real just
being yourself… ROSS SHEGOG: And after a
2 year period the program was shown to be effective
into delaying initiation. CHRISTINE MARKHAM: We
see tangible results, we see communities’ lives
changing with the work that we’re doing. Some of the projects that I
have been involved personally, we developed interventions
here in Houston that then have been
used across the country. So when you see
that kind of impact, when you see your programs being
used on a really wide scale, impacting other communities that’s really a
rewarding feeling. NATALIA HEREDIA: As a student
you get the opportunity to kind of apply the things that
you learned in the classroom into an actual specific
real world setting. So you get to see kind
of like these abstracts theoretical concepts
actually play out. MARIA FERNANDEZ:
The vision is impact, having the greatest impact
on health and quality of life that we can. ♪ [MUSIC] ♪

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *