Cloud in Healthcare

Cloud in Healthcare



it's truly an amazing time to be involved in healthcare technology over the last decade we have witnessed significant changes in medicine and perhaps most relevant to this audience is the digitization of health data and yet today we stand at a significant juncture we have created and will increasingly create vast amounts of digital health data yet much of that data remains under utilized and siloed in the organizations that hold it challenges of interoperability limited access to computing resources at scale and the critical need for security and privacy protections have often made it difficult for health care systems and life sciences companies to translate these rich data sets into meaningful improvements additionally the creation and collection of this status puts significant strains and individuals within the healthcare system including patients and their providers yet I despite these challenges I see a bright future by granting providers and biomedical researchers access to better flow of data by a cloud we're working to inspire new discoveries with AI and ml which we expect will lead to insights to improve patient outcomes I see a world where cloud and new AI supported clinical insights and workflows will help providers spend more time engaging with their patients and less time facing computers I see a world where cloud enables us to turn petabytes of healthcare genomic imaging clinical and claims data into breakthroughs and better care and streamlined operations unlocking the power of this health data is not easy requires deep collaboration and partnership with each of our stakeholders including patients and requires careful data stewardship and protection of patient privacy this journey holds great promise for positively transforming the way health care is the and enabling access for care discovery and insight as we are successful I believe these changes will lead to improved outcomes increase patient and provider satisfaction lower costs accelerated biomedical research discovery and ultimately better health for everyone on the planet today I'm fortunate to be joined by two luminaries in healthcare and biomedical research Andrea Norris is NIH chief information officer and director of this Center for information technology as the NIH CIO miss Norris oversees NIH is one billion-dollar IT portfolio which supports scientific research and discovery in addition as director of NIH his Center for information technology she manages a wide range of NIH wide information and information technology services including a state-of-the-art high-speed research network the biowulf high-performance scientific computing system and cloud-based collaboration and tool platforms and tools bioinformatics research programs business solutions and applications and not to forget the NIH data center and the 24 by 7 operations of its distributed computing environment my second guest dr. toby cosgrove this former CEO and president of cleveland clinic he went to the University of Virginia School of Medicine and received a Bronze Star in the US Air Force in Vietnam as a cardiac surgeon he performed more than 22,000 operations and holds 30 patents for medical innovations where additionally excited to announce today that dr. Cosgrove is joining Google Club health care team is an executive advisor and now please join me thank you and please join me now in welcoming Andrian tobe thanks so much for joining us here today like to ask you a few questions for the audience Andrea first what do you think are the largest drivers of change in health care and biomedical research today so Craig as you know the National Institutes of Health is the largest funder biomedical research in the world 80% of NIH funds roughly 35 billion dollars a year supports scientific research by 300,000 researchers all over the United States in some cases around the world today we stand at a unique moment of opportunity for biomedical research now we're able to harness the power and rapid advances of the technologies to accelerate discovery of new drugs new therapeutic treatments and cures in ways we just could not have imagined a short time ago we're generating vast amounts of biomedical research data it's doubling every seven to ten months exponential growth in genomic sequencing data huge volumes of high-value data from electronic health records mobile health technologies like personal EKGs diabetes treatment and even my own Fitbit medical imaging data even behavioral data data about the experiences that we have throughout our life based on where we were born live work and play this data deluge has led to many new big data research programs at NIH our cancer moonshot program is an ambitious effort to accelerate cancer how we detect how we treat and how we cure hundreds of different types of cancers our brain initiative to revolutionize our understanding of the human brain and how it works enabling us to make better diagnoses and to treat illnesses such as depression Parkinson's and Alzheimer's and our new NIH data Commons which is a group of innovative projects testing new approaches new tools in that's for working with and sharing this big data in the cloud we're experimenting with rich datasets across many different data domains and scientific data disciplines in ways we just could not do before these are just three exciting programs we have underway where we're seeing tremendous opportunities for discovery but there are challenges most of our research data is siloed in single computers or service servers not integrated not connected we need to make research data more fair findable accessible interoperable and reusable and most important we need to make sure we are always protecting the privacy and security of an individual's health information or other sensitive data we take that responsibility very seriously we're also seeing some exciting opportunities in the areas of machine learning and artificial intelligence in fact yesterday and I ate just sponsored a very large workshop on these topics to see how we can use these capabilities to accelerate medical advances how can we do a better job in recommending patient treatment options and how can we do a better job in predicting the outcomes of those treatments today it takes about a billion dollars in up to 10 years to get a successful new drug to use how can we do that better faster safer and cheaper and how can we accelerate computer aided diagnosis using MRI other kinds of imaging data or other diagnostic medical procedures so we're at an exciting time and we think we're just there's a lot more to come we're just at the beginning it's truly an exciting time and an amazing amount of work going on at NIH thank you thank you for that summary Toby what do you think of the largest drivers of change in healthcare today well Gregg we're seeing two really big things they're going on in health right now healthcare is in the process of moving from art to science and as you move make that move you have to have data and as you say we've got a data deluge coming on now the electronic medical record is present across the United States really recording a hundreds of millions of people's exams and physical findings then we've got digitization just take a mammogram for example there's as much information in one mammogram as there are in the entire New York City phonebook huge amounts of data then genomics is another area with 3 billion base pairs at every human genome then we've also have a tremendous input of data from scholarly works there are now 5,600 journals putting out over 800,000 articles a year that's more than I can keep up with and you stop and think about this the explosion of data can only be looked at in sort of retrospect 100 years ago the total amount of knowledge in health care doubled every 150 years by 2020 the total amount of knowledge and healthcare will be doubling every 73 days stunning so we have to be able to categorize that and we have to be able to store it we have to access it and we have to interpret it big challenges going forward the second thing that we really are dealing with is the explosion and cost in healthcare right now as all of you know the total portion of the GDP is 18% and the concern is that it's going to go up and begin to limit the other things we can do like education across the country and what we are seeing is concerning the fact that we may be seeing more pressure on healthcare as we go forward to things the silver tsunami of people who are aging right now there's 10,000 people a day who turn 65 and the out life expectancy now is approaching 80 years of a so a tremendous number of older people the second thing that we have got to deal with is we can do more and more for people as we go forward just think about 20 years ago we didn't have great joint replacements we didn't have a cart nearly the cardiac surgery we have now we didn't have transplantations anywhere near what we're seeing and similarly cancer care was not curing as many people as it does now so we have got two things going on one an explosion of data we've got to learn how to deal with but you can also help us and secondly we've got the cost and we're going to require both technology and the ability to manage that data to for us to get better care and control the cost yes sir certainly this many challenges but opportunities ahead as you put as you pointed out with this explosion of data and explosion of knowledge I think it's our responsibility to figure out how to use all of that for better patient outcomes Andrea what do you think these changes mean for the individual citizen so at NIH we're working to better understand disease and match the best care for you based on your unique health identity your health characteristics your life experiences your genetic profile are all of us program recently launched in May is among the most ambitious research effort that our nation has ever undertaken we aim to collect a massive amount of individual health data from a million participants across the United States it remains the hope for all of us to come together to help change the future of healthcare our goal is to uncover paths towards delivering precision medicine individualized prevention treatment and care for all of us participation is open to everyone we want to reflect the rich diversity of our country participants will be partners who are willing to share your biology lifestyle and environmental day to help research you'll be a true partner with ongoing opportunities to help shape the program with your input you'll have access to study information and data about yourself with choices about how much or how little information you want to receive and rest assured all of us is employing state-of-the-art security technologies and following strict security protocols and processes to protect your data and assure it is used ethically the all of us data and Research Center is powered by Google cloud and is supported by very early life sciences together with Vanderbilt University and the Broad Institute to allow anywhere everywhere researcher access including citizen scientist key questions we hope to help answer how can we prevent the chronic pain that afflict affects more than a million people across the United States each year or develop better pain medicines that are not addictive how can we slow down or stop different kinds of dementia did you know that every 66 seconds someone in the United States is diagnosed with Alzheimer's more than 5 million individuals live with Alzheimer's my mother was one of those as well develop treatments for diabetes which affects almost 10% of all Americans were again better yet prevented altogether and develop more cancer cures that will work the first time so we can skip painful trial-and-error chemotherapy I encourage everyone to sign up at all of us at NIH gaagh learn about your own health including personalized risk factors and studies that lead to new understanding and treatments help fight disease and improve the health for you your family and friends and future generations it will take all of us to be successful at this a truly important work Thank You Andrea and I'll put a plug in for that all of us nih.gov we're delighted to host that and who will cloud together with verily and our partners abroad as well Toby same question for you what do these changes mean for the individual patient well it's great a great question and it's really exciting everything is going to change you know who we're what we're diseases were treating is going to change we're now seeing more chronic disease the acute disease is going away and 85% of our costs in healthcare now for chronic disease so it's going to be a big push on keeping people well the second thing is going to change is how we treat them and it's going to be much more personalized medicine as the human genome becomes a regular part of our therapy for patients where we going to treat them is going to be different you're not going to treat chronic diseases in the hospital anymore you're going to treat them at home you've got a female patient and a lot of it is going to be done by virtual visits in fact some hospitals now systems are beginning to see only half of their doctor visits are being done in person big change there then you have to say who's going to treat them well we're got about a hundred a thousand doctor shortage across the United States so you're going to see more and more nurses and physicians assistants stepping in to be able to help and that's one of the ways that technology can really support them and the other question is who's going to pay for it we now see that high deductibles are part of what's going on and co-pays and so people are now interested in how much things cost and what the results are going to be so they're pushing more and more towards value for health care and that is where it's going to the information it's going to be ubiquitous people are going to deal with it everywhere they're going to use it as they want to use it they're going to measure the value and I think that this is a tremendous change for healthcare providers and for the entire healthcare system in the United States in fact really around the world certainly data is going to be key importance to businesses for health care systems to really survive in the age of value-based care and knowing that data and action unit you're right you're absolutely right and this is the key to driving quality and taking cost Oh indeed so so tell me this thinking about your four decades of experience at Cleveland Clinic how can you give us how this technology impacted the practice of medicine in your experience and what you've seen oh my gosh it's affected almost everything I must remember back when I did my first paper what we did is we had spreadsheets a big yellow pieces of paper and we used to go in on Sunday afternoon and make telephone calls to find out how people were going things have changed just a little bit over that period of time but let's take heart surgery for example heart surgery everybody has heard the expression the cracking the chest well that was an incision that was about this long then it went to minimally invasive which was about a two and a half inch incision then it went to robotics which was three little 1 centimeter incision and now heart valves are being delivered with the catheter with no incisions whatsoever very exciting change there and then let's take stroke people used to have a stroke and there was nothing you could do for them you would count on rehabilitation now we have got clot-busting drugs and also we have mobile stroke units so we're beginning to take the care to the patient and when somebody has a symptom that sounds like a stroke you just you dispatch an ambulance it can go and do the cat scan in the driveway and then through telemedicine they can read it and start the drugs right there saving millions of brain cells for patients and now what's really exciting it is on the verge of actual actually treating patients and multiple patients but we're starting to put pacemakers in people's brains in the area of infarction and seeing much more rapid rehabilitation and gaining there activities backtalk closer to normal finally let's look at cancer cancer used to be a something that you treated and you gave the chemo therapeutic agents and you saw if they work and that they didn't work you try something else is really a trial and error now what we're doing is we're sequencing the patient we're sequencing the tumor and we're directing the chemotherapeutic agent to the particular genome genotype of the cancer and then repeatedly doing it over treatment period that does a number of things it decreases in the morbidity of it and improves the treatment and improves the mortality rates and clearly it's much more efficient so the changes that have gone on have been built around new technology and new knowledge and I am so excited about what we're seeing going forward because now we have the opportunity to understand all the things that go on across the body and much more detail and treat them much more efficiently and much less and basically it's a great time for medicine as I said truly an exciting time to be involved in healthcare technology a terrific really really appreciate you plugging and helped guide us here at Google cloud last question for Andrea partnerships will continue to be key for transformation in healthcare and biomedical research can you share your thoughts and how NIH is approaching transformation and partnerships so at NIH we can only achieve the kind of advances we need through partnerships with academia other research institutions the public and industry we cannot do this alone and I'd like to acknowledge the important support that Google has provided to NIH over the last several years in some of the key program areas we've talked about today gregor was a few short months ago when we met to talk about the opportunity to join forces and modernize our research data ecosystem through the use of state-of-the-art cloud platforms software and we talked about how important it is to stay focused on our missions and we acknowledge that NIH is mission to pursue and apply fundamental knowledge about living systems to extend healthy life and reduce disease and Google's mission to organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful are clearly synergistic and we've learned that cloud computing can overcome many of the data challenges we face scalable storage elastic computing and all the rich tools for data preparation and analysis in line with NIH as first-ever strategic plan for data science today NIH launched a new initiative to harness the power of commercial cloud computing and provide NIH researchers access to the most advanced computational infrastructure tools and services we're calling it the strides initiative it stands for science and technology research infrastructure for discovery experimentation and sustainability it's a mouthful and as Diane Greene just announced this morning we're delighted that Google cloud is our first industry partner this innovative partnership will allow hundreds of thousands of researchers those working at both the NIH and at the more than 2,500 academic institutions to make use of Google clouds technologies and services to advance health and reduce the burden of disease and a more cost-effective an equally important a more sustainable framework our initial efforts are going to focus on making nih-funded high-value biomedical datasets accessible through commercial cloud platforms this data will be incorporate standards that are endorsed by the medical research community and naval individuals with all levels of expertise to find access reuse and share this high value research data and will do all of this while insuring the safeguards that are needed to secure and protect the privacy of your personal health information or other sensitive data we're also partnering with Google cloud to take advantage of some of the amazing innovations we've heard about already today machine learning artificial intelligence experimenting with new ways to optimize technology intensive research hoping to capitalize on some of the opportunities we've been discussing in addition we plan to establish training programs for researchers on how to use the Google cloud platform for health research so why are we excited about this put simply our partners like Google cloud will provide the state-of-the-art platforms and tools we need to support our new computationally intensive data rich biomedical research programs that means our incredibly talented researchers can focus their efforts on what they do best applying the best scientific expertise methods and tools to make new critically needed discoveries and breakthroughs and help we hope our strides initiative will begin to shift today's research paradigm to a richer and more collaborative model Gregg together we can take advantage of this great opportunity to implement an open interconnected and sustainable ecosystem for collaboration and discovery where we can bring the best scientific and technical insight into some of our most challenging health problems and in this way with help from Google cloud we believe we can begin making great strides to accelerate discovery and improve your lives the lives of your family and for right now and for future generations to come Thank You Andrea we couldn't be more excited we Google Claude to partner with NIH is truly important work thank you with that I'm going to thank my guests and we have another fantastic panel to follow

Related Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *