Glucosamine For Joint & Digestive Health | BodyManual

Glucosamine For Joint & Digestive Health | BodyManual


Hi, Dr. Huntington here. In this video,
we’re going to cover the compound called glucosamine. Particularly how it
might help you with joint pain and digestive issues, including irritable
bowel syndrome, Crohn’s disease and the repair of a leaky gut. There’s
also some evidence that it may help with autoimmune reactions and the healing of
broken bones. To understand how this is possible, it helps to know a little
bit about glucosamine and how it functions. You see, your body manufactures
glucosamine, but only in really small amounts and, unfortunately, as you age
your body makes less of it. For both of these reasons, glucosamine is a
popular supplement – and at the end of the video I’ll give you some dosage
guidelines, in terms of supplementation. One of the main functions of
glucosamine is its role to help build connective tissue (like cartilage), which
provides the cushioning at the end of your bones, as well as protecting and
strengthening your joints. It does this by providing lubrication and
serving like a shock absorber. In addition to being directly involved in
the process of making connective tissue, glucosamine also can ease pain and
inflammation. The form of glucosamine that’s typical, in
terms of using it for joint health and cartilage building, is called glucosamine
sulfate. That’s what you’d want to look for on the label if you’re looking
to use this for joint health. When it comes to digestion and healing the lining
of your digestive tract, as well as healing
intestinal disorders like irritable bowel, Crohn’s or leaky gut, it’s the
anti-inflammatory properties of glucosamine – along with the fact that it
helps build connective tissue that seems to make it effective.
One of the best sources of glucosamine is bone broth. It
contains lots of glucosamine as well as other glycosaminoglycans, which you’ll
see you referred to as ‘GAG’ – and I’ve got that right here on the board if you
want to see the the spelling of that term.
These GAG’s are vital to your joint health and to the health of your gut as
well. GAG’s support digestive health by creating a mucus that heals intestinal
inflammation and at the same time supports the proliferation of the good
bacteria in your gut. The form that tends to act specifically on the
intestinal lining is called n-acetyl glucosamine,
which I’ve got here. It’s often abbreviated as ‘NAG’. This is
the ingredient that you’ll want to see in any supplement claiming to support
intestinal health – and that’s why I’ve included this form of glucosamine –
N-acetylglucosamine – in the supplement Leaky Gut Support, which you can find at
bodymanual.com. It’s a great product for overall gut support, so
you’ll want to increase your intake of glucosamine if you have symptoms which
match the conditions I mentioned earlier, particularly joint or
digestive issues. Or if you’re participating high impact activities which are hard on your joints or you’re over the age of 40, since the
amount of glucosamine your body makes tends to decrease with age – your best
source is going to be two places. You can get a lot through your food –
by drinking bone broth. It’s a good habit to make
bone broth part of your weekly meal planning. The other way to get large
amounts of glucosamine is by taking dietary supplement that contains
glucosamine. In terms of dosage, adults can take up to about 1500
milligrams per day. If you want to enhance the effect of glucosamine for a
joint health, what you can do is combine it with other
cartilage building compounds. Probably the most popular being
chondroitin sulfate. You can also take it with natural anti-inflammatories
like vitamin B3, which you’ll see listed on labels as niacin. Alright, well
hopefully it helps you get more familiar with glucosamine and some
basics of what it does and why it’s an important part of your
overall health and diet. Alright, I’ll see you in the next video.

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