Measuring Well-Being and Wellness

Measuring Well-Being and Wellness



our last session today is measuring well-being and wellness which as I know is a topic that's near and dear to all of our hearts but pleasure to introduce Dana Taysom who is the executive director of student health and counseling Portland State University welcome thanks to having welcome everyone and thanks for being here I am Dana TAS and I'm the executive director at Portland State for our integrated health and counseling and also a board member at large for your acha board we have a great panel here today and they're going to introduce themselves I'll say a bit about their background and where they are hi I'm Michele Burson my current role is an academic program director for a fully online mph program at Walden University in my previous life I worked at the University of South Carolina for many years heading up their healthy Carolina initiative my name is Nicole Brocato I'm the director of the well-being assessment project at Wake Forest University I'm a psychologist by training with a mixed background in clinical and psychometrics wonderful good afternoon everyone my name is Robert reason I'm a professor of Education higher education and student affairs at Iowa State University and I think I was invited because I also do I used to be the director of the Research Institute for studies in education at Iowa State and we run something called the personal and social responsibility inventory and have done some work around wellness using quarry keys and his instruments oh wait that's my background okay Thank You panel for being here today we're going to touch on the measurement of the very at various aspects of well-being that we may have covered today a disclaimer my illustrious panel members have said that each one of these questions could potentially be a semester-long class and none of us want that so they're going to do their best to kind of hit the highlights for us especially touching on you know ways we might measure some of these aspects of wellness the difference is that those measurements might lead to and also how we might do it for those of us who don't have extensive budgets to do this kind of work but still want to employ best practices so with that I'm going to go on to the first question and this is the easiest one I think given the the aspects of well-being that we have discussed in Prior panels what measurement challenges do we face well I think I'm going to take a stab at this one first I think one of our measurement challenges brings us back to where we started at the beginning of all our discussions which is continuing to think about what our theories about what well-being is and what are the models that we're building on those theories there's as Jenny said yesterday there's 2 millennia of people who have been thinking and writing and researching about this so we have almost an overwhelming amount of information to draw on so as we are trying to get better at defining concrete and specific and actionable models for our well-being programs that are specific to the unique needs and cultures and interests and capacities of our campuses one of the things that's starting to happen is we're getting lots of models that sound sort of the same but then there's defined slightly differently and it's I think it's making a little bit of a measurement challenge so if I measure meaning one way and you measure it something else can we compare those things I I'm not exactly sure and I wonder sometimes as well if in our efforts to make our models very specific and concrete we might be overly narrowly defining meaning sometimes by confusing pathways to meaning without comes from our pathways to well-being without comes for well-being so outcomes being big strokes things that we all care about for the sake of themselves meaning purpose belonging pathways to well-being being the things that get us there so in the context of meaning that might be and I'm going to pick on meditation a little bit because it's also been around for 2,000 years and I think it can take it meditating to gain the kind of self compassion and clarity you need to do the self-reflection that will help you define the goals and create the value systems that create a sense of meaning and purpose but if we mix up our pathways and outcomes and say instead actually well-being is meditation and self-reflection we run the risk of alienating students for whom meditation is inappropriate or students who are depressed and are already ruminating so there I think our conceptualizations perhaps of well-being that focus like the end so all this is coming from the engine model of well-being which is a paper written by Iran DiGiacomo his faculty at Wake Murray Forge Yard whose name I think I just mingled and Martin Seligman and they published this in 2012 and basically this model says in our models of well-being we need to be focusing on big-picture outcomes and keep those things distinct from the pathways that get us to well-being so that we don't overly define or exclude people from our models of well-being and how would we go about measuring those pathways so it's not confused with the outcomes so we I don't know how to say this without sounding like an advertisement and the well-being assessment we are attempting to do that we've got items that we treat as indicators for instance of whether we have meaning people have meaning and we've got items that ask do you have a value set do you have people in your life you can talk to are you using this range of skills that would maybe help you develop a sense of meaning in life but I don't think necessarily in the spirit of diversity and inclusion and equity that the the well-being assessment or necessarily the engine model are the answers for all campuses they're saying something more along the lines of they are an option for making sure that we keep these things separate for each from each other so if I go back to the first question and talk about one of the challenges I'd highlight I can just for transparency sake I come at most of my work from a social psych kind of perspective trying to balance kind of understanding the individual within a condo and so you'll hear me say multiple times today it depends on the context and so Nicole talked about models and theories and I'm gonna suggest then the next step in which then creates the next challenge is how do you operationalize what you mean by wellness which i think is also what what Nicole was saying so what does wellness mean what does well-being mean on your campus and then how do you create a set of items if that's what you're going to do that assesses well-being in that way because again well-being in any of our campuses may be operationalized differently and so the so that we got a challenge of operationalizing within the context of your individual campus which then raises all sorts of other issues about transferability and generalizability and those kinds of things if you care about those things now the other thing is I'm gonna suggest a couple of times maybe we don't have to care about those things so much as long as we understand it within the context of our campuses our individual campuses and the work we're trying to do the other thing I would say is remembering to think about well-being as a construct made up of lots of different things so we're not gonna find an item or I would I would suggest we're probably not going to find a single set of items that comprehensively assesses or measures what we mean by well-being and so we're gonna look at multiple surveys multiple sets of items multiple observations that would get to some better understanding of well-being and our effect on well-being the effects of our programs on well-being and the improving well-being and the students were served so operationalization as a struggle or as a challenge as well as thinking about it as a construct Michelle did you have anything to say about the challenges you faced in your work sure so I come from a student affairs perspective and so I attended many American College Health Association conferences and would come back to my office and be like I can't do that I don't have the band with person power I don't have the financials or whatever and I think I think it's really important to take away that there's a lot of data on your campus already and you don't necessarily need a giant NIH grant or gazillions of dollars to to get your hands on good data and the important thing is is doing something with that data often we're inundated with data and then we don't do anything with it so having it's not very helpful but thinking about your partners across the campus via in housing or police department or campus recreation the utilization of your health center your America electronic medical record your utilization in the Career Services Counseling Center looking at all your partners and what data they're collecting and maybe you develop an instrument out of all these different measures all across your campus because you don't have the ability to customize an instrument and deliver it and so just coming about it from a perspective of doing something is better than saying I can't do anything and there isn't perfect data there you're never gonna have perfect data even if you create the instrument and I think the other thing to think about is it doesn't always have to be paper to pencil self-reported data it can be observational based data it can be qualitative based data where you're doing key informant interviews you guys have key leaders on your campus use them have one-on-one conversations with them take them to lunch go to sorority fraternity counsel go to your student athlete Advisory Council making sure that you have good connections with those leaders on campus and do those key informant interviews focus groups where you can gather really really good rich data that may help tell the story of the numbers that you're getting so this question might dev tale nicely with that because we know we can spend anything from nothing to ten million dollars over four years on kinds of assessment given that most of us don't have that kind of budget how can we tell what's good enough for our purpose yeah so I'll jump on that one real fast I think that's hard because the researcher in my brain is like well it's got to be good research practices or the data is not valid but I think it's also having some information your electronic medical record is a great resource to pull aggregate data there there is a wealth of data on your campus and having access to it yesterday in a session I thought someone had like picked my brain because I had just been writing it down about having it an item on your course evaluations I think that's brilliant if your university mission has health well-being or wellness in it that has opened the door in my opinion for you to have that conversation with the academic side of the house to say our university mission talks about health and well-being we need to put that into the classroom and so can we please add an item on to this and as someone said yesterday that'll get the fastest attention of your faculty members which are an untapped in my opinion untapped resource on your campus when I was in Student Affairs I'm getting off on the tangent a little bit here but when I was in Student Affairs when I first started I very much felt like the faculty member where are these I've they were in this IV ivory tower and they were untouchable and I think that thought process needs to go out the window because you have carrots that they want so the whole carrot mentality you have access to students you have buildings on your campus for meeting with students you have the ability to connect with students that a faculty member may not and so having that understanding of who your partners are on your campus that do student based research I know where I work we have a product called digital measures and it's where faculty load all their research interest so if I was at a liberal arts university and I may not have a School of Public Health where it may be difficult to find my partner this digital measures allows me to query and find out who's doing research in post-traumatic stress because that's what I'm working on right now or emergency preparedness I can query down to find my faculty partner I think that's really important in faculty members want access they want to have they want to help letters of support for T and P tenure and promotion go a very long way so I think tangent there but it's a very much an untapped resource that can help make the data that you have more powerful I guess is the best way to look at it anyone else want to say something about how do we tell when it's good enough what do we need to look for it sure I we I was thinking about this since we touched base yesterday my mentor when I was in my first faculty position used to say like weekly research design is a series of compromises and so we can start with the best research design humanly possible and then knowing we have to keep backing away and keep making those compromises until we reach something that is as good as it can be and still good enough and most of the time is when when I've been thinking about what we're talking about today and well-being it's often about what what the purpose is and what the audience is who the audience is for the research or assessment we want to I also want to get away from the word research because I think what we should be talking about his assessment research brings with it all sorts of that baggage that that Michelle was talking about when it comes to faculty in big dollar research projects and that's probably not what most of us are able to do on our campuses most of what we're trying to do is assessment to figure out whether what we're doing the interventions where we're doing the offices and our activities are positively affecting the well-being of the students and that's an assessment question much little een a much further away from a research question so good enough has to change because the purpose of what we're doing is is changing and the audience is changing the purpose of assessing how well our intervention is working to improve well-being has an audience of the office the students and potentially your supervisor who you do have to go ask money from but that's the audience so good enough is different than if you're trying to publish in a refereed archival journal someday those are two separate purposes and so good enough meets our assessment of good enough needs to change because of that so again research design is a series of compromises I now subject my grad students to that about once a week as well but I think it's just a great way to remember we shoot for the best and then make the compromises that are necessary so that we can do what's important and I think that a lot of schools are doing a pretty good job with this actually I don't want us to instill any sort of anxiety that everybody has to run out and find better measures through the course of working on the well-being assessment we've had lots of conversations with lots of schools who are trying to find measures that are right both for their overall initiatives which is a slightly different measurement question then how is my two-hour workshop as Friday afternoon working and I think people are already being very thoughtful about this and very intentional about this in making use of existing measures so my impression is that folks are on the right path we've touched on this a bit in the beginning but how do we take the evidence and measurement that we have and apply it effectively in regards to implementation of programming or talking to administration about our programming or making adjustments to our programming so I have to do a healthy campus plug the healthy campus website off of acha it has a great framework called map it in what it does it walks you through the process it takes you through having data and how you take priorities and how you make your campus priorities where you start with the data and how you get to doing something with that data it could be as simple as running a gap analysis you look at where you are where your campus wants you to be you pick the one with the biggest gap and you jump in I mean I think making data informed decisions is the is the base right that's where we want to start we want to do good data based decisions I think again I'm going to go back to the academic side being an untapped resource I find when I talk to administrators they're overwhelmed with the data because their day to day life doesn't allow them to sit and have fun in SPSS and run this data right they're so busy seeing patients and crisis management putting out fires when do they have a chance just to sit back and look at the data and what they should be addressing and that's where I think playing into some of your academic partnerships could could be to your advantage just to give you an example my academic program has an SPSS course where the students run SPSS data and they come out with output they're running data that's helpful for me like that's not hard here's a data set I took all the qualifiers out you don't need to know the people's names but how about you answer this research question for me and your whole class gives me the answer or you want to know your biggest problem on campus give them your NACHA take all the qualifiers out and let students do the research you have students on your campus learning how to or needing to learn how to take data and present it to a population or target population why can't they use your nacha data why can't they take the data that you have answer your research question and do a presentation for you that's I mean they're gonna do your work for you and they're learning at the same time and your students want to learn with real data they don't want to make-believe datasets so that's a little off topic again but I think it's I think it's an untapped resource I can't say that enough as far as using your students various programs dissertation students running data on your nacha or whatever other instrument that you have in keeping with the idea that not everything has to be researched quality for a top-tier Journal the analyses that we're doing to get just a basic analysis of the texts of our campus or if our program made a difference it doesn't have to be longitudinal cross lag latent growth anything it can just be some descriptives about where people are where they were and the other important part of that puzzle is having some context against which to interpret your information so if you get NACHA data back and you just look at your own school's information but don't see don't compare it to the national rates it can be easy to misinterpret what you're seeing so think about what your school's missions and priorities are focus on those particular areas and then look at maybe your depression items and go oh my students are really depressed instead of saying this is an emergency that's special to us you can look at the national data and go oh this is an emergency that's special to everybody survey fatigue we've all had it on our campuses we all have it are there ways that we can measure without doing another survey of students I mean I think that goes back to using measures that are already being collected on your campus or doing qualitative based research and not having to send you know 22,000 students another survey that they're not going to respond to or incentivizing them with a budget that maybe doesn't have the bandwidth to incentivize to get a decent response rate using items that are already on campus or sitting down with individuals and talking through what you're seeing what they're seeing and again we've heard it over and over again as hearing from the students hearing from the population that we're addressing and working with and getting their voice and so we don't always hear that voice in the quantitative data you have to pull that qualitative and again you have students are learning to be qualitative researchers on your campus use them help them get real-world experience and make good use of the data that you have across measure so I know a lot of times we get data back that's de-identified meaning it doesn't have student IDs or emails or other things that can help you across the data sets but a lot of them have enough similar items enough similar demographic items that you can use that information to kind of ground your interpretation across the measures so that if you measure s about my bout depression and my aunt measure also asked about depression now you don't have to ask about it because we've already asked about it a couple of times so be working with your campus partners in all the departments to understand what data already exists and how you can interpret those sets of data with respect to each other and I would challenge I would like to encourage you to challenge your assessment directors at your division level so that at the Division of Student Affairs level so that there is open dialogue between departments about what's happening so you don't have four departments asking about the same thing in four different ways and you get four different answers and you don't know they're not it's not helpful but challenging someone on the campus to take ownership of assessment of well-being or just assessment in general so that you can work together and you know you know housing sends out their assessment every April well you know we're gonna do the nacho let's make sure we're not doing at the same time and can we have items in there on yours we'll have items on ours how can we partner on this instead of us saying in these silos even in programming and assessment have a one thought one original thought perhaps and then just a co-signing of what Michelle just said not everything needs to be assessed every year right and again I run I'm actually two national surveys that I work with institutions on and we recommend every three years and I think even the folks at Nessie are now recommending every other year every three years because nothing you know we're like the big ship things don't change dramatically every year so we don't have to do all three surveys every year we can we can space them out and I think that's important to remember the other thing I'm on a cosign what Michelle said that when that using existing data and so if you're collecting from the nasi there are items on there that begin to serve when you look at them may they begin to serve as proxies for well-being but because that's a secondary source of data you're not gonna have the questions that gonna be asked exactly how you would like to ask it as it relates to how you operate your understanding of well well-being or wellness so you then get to follow up and ask a student and then Sue yesterday from Duke during the first session said something about finding these these data one of these one of their findings from an existing survey we're reporting had gone up and some folks were interpreting that as a good thing and some people were saying oh my gosh you know the number of drinking behaviors negative drinking behaviors or the number of sexual assaults is going up we're in trouble and nobody knew how to interpret it the folks who know how to interpret that are the folks who responded to the surveys right and so maybe not in that particular instance but if you're talking to somebody and you gets if if you're looking at data that somebody else collected and it's showing an increase in certain behavior and you don't know whether that's because awareness is up or because drinking is up ask the folks who took the survey they'll tell you so don't forget to do the mixed methods talk to folks talk to your key providers who are interacting with students and that'll help kind of make sense of the quantitative data that might have been collected for another reason I also keep you from doing another survey I think a lot of these comments have been talking about getting an overview of your campus and how your campus is doing in general and I mentioned but that's a slightly different measurement question from evaluating how is my particular well-being program about figuring out what my values are how that's doing and I think you can put these pieces of information together so a lot of these surveys these large-scale surveys focus again on what more what we would call outcomes of big-picture issues like meaning purpose and belonging but you can use all your program evaluation and student feedback about your programs to get a sense of what's happening at the pathway level and if some of your programs are moving your pathways and that is what is contributing to changes or lack of changes that you're seeing in your overall outcomes over time so even in the presence of all these alternatives what if you still really want to do a survey what are some of the ways that we can get around the obstacles mostly of survey fatigue but what are some best practices to do that to make it the most effective if we're going to go through all that work well thinking at the campus level you probably don't need to survey everybody on campus and so if you're if you're working with your IR folks are you working with your assessment folks to take a sample of students or staff who can take the survey who are representative of the bigger population and then balance that off so the next survey goes to who's left over so yeah individuals aren't getting to surveys in succession or three or four surveys a year they're getting one or two a year that is sound research design you know we we do sampling all the time and it's actually in certain cases better than in census or population samples because it can can greater you can get a better sense from folks who may not regularly respond whereas if you get a census sample you may lack in in the case of students men men don't respond very well to surveys at all and so we get it particularly men of color right particularly men of color so we get a sense of the campus from a from a non representative population even though we think we've surveyed everybody and those are important issues to keep in mind so certain survey sampling is one way to Deloitte some of that if you're strategic about it the other again is just make sure you ask make sure you're you're thinking strategically at the university or college level about the surveys that are going out in a given period of time probably most folks are doing that now a year in advance thinking about well next spring we're doing the PSR I or the Nesi so we have to not do with something else in the fall and making sure that you're only asking the questions that you find actionable which is another thing a large multi-page survey where only the last three items are actionable is frustrating for all of us my research faculty member beat in my head don't ask a question if you don't plan on doing something with the answer or if you don't want to know the answer I think is equally important like if you already know what you want the answer to be you may not want to ask that question so being prepared to get answers that you're not loving or if you're not gonna do something with it don't ask it I think that's really big and preparing students that the survey is coming particularly groups that are less prone to participating so working with the folks that run your first-generation programs getting in touch with your offices of diversity and inclusion trying to understand how you can make up these folks feel more engaged in the research and more part of the research so that we can get a better understanding of what's going on in the well-being assessment we administered it to 16 schools across the country last year we had a sample size of 6300 there were still a couple of race by gender groups for whom I only had two or three participants in those cells so in the interest of making sure that we're addressing this problem that well-being can be perceived as whiteness we need to make sure that we're really sampling our students well and encouraging them to be a part of that work and I think on a college campus helping the students understand the importance of the data and what you plan on doing with the data and maybe in the past what that data has led to as far as changes on your campus so if it's the nacha and you're doing this every three years what has happened as a result of it we asked about X and as a result we did why and making sure that the students know it's almost like that their voice is being heard and it equals something and it's just not I'm a number and I'm gonna doesn't matter but that something could actually change if we hear from you but we don't know what to change if we don't hear from you that's a great suggestion we used I used to work more closely with a CT and they would say this the places where they get the best survey responses are those places that share transparently that this office is open until 8 o'clock on Wednesday nights because you told us needed to be those kinds of here's how we're using your your findings from last year the last couple of years helps students recognize the importance of surveys you know there are other strategies we haven't talked about incentivizing responses you know a raffle for everybody who those work as long as they you know it's it's meaningful and it's meaningful to your campus I worked with a couple of institutions who raffle raffled off to people who responded to surveys a close up parking spot for a month which certain institutions in the north that month should be January or February and having a close up reserved parking spot was a great incentive so you can do certain things like that more than like two bucks or or a potential for a gift card or another iPod we used to do iPads and iPods all the time everyone's got one so that's no longer all that effective but be thoughtful and creative when it comes to those kinds of things and you can boost your response rates I would suggest it I've heard a couple of schools doing this that data town halls are a great way both to get students involved and to do some of that qualitative work we've been talking about so you can say to your students here's the number that we're seeing this doesn't make sense to us what sense does it make to you in actively involving the fact the students in your research like good old fast fashion nominal group process if you as a department are trying to figure out programming for the 2018-2019 calendar year and you have them all on poster boards and you give everyone those little dots that we have to use on medical records and ask them to vote I mean it sounds very archaic but it involves the students again in collecting information very different way actually significantly cheaper and faster because you can look visually and say oh this is what they are interested in very simple but a very quick way to get information well the parking space definitely I'm going to remember that so imagine for a moment that you are the director in a smaller school maybe with just a few people in your center but you still want to do this work because you know it's important any any tips for the smaller organization that might not have a lot of resources to do some of these things yeah I actually have a thought that I think is probably relevant to all of us which is don't try to do all the things all at once we can only well being as we keep talking about cover so much conceptual and applied territory focus on one or two things a year and start there make all your measurement and programming evaluation work that year about belonging and engagement and it may actually need to be more than a year because you may need to do one year to assess things and another year to see how your change has worked I think she you just hit on something that I think many of us in student affairs struggle with and that's the pause assess and then do because we want to go we want we want we want our keys we run our office and we want to hit the ground running in that pause and collecting data and getting a good baseline I mean all of us have to fight for our positions at times right budgets are tight data is gonna be your best friend in that and that pause will give you good baseline hopefully good data to then make your case going forward but just taking that second just to be and figure out what you need to do before you jump in and we think often time how we find ourselves in the position of really wanting to pause but then other forces kick in like someone in the School of Social Work is doing you know a wellness project and do you want to be involved and you know not really cuz you have other things to do but you don't want it to happen without you either I think that's the power of saying no right I mean if your department is has a strategic plan and you're only working in these two specific areas and someone contacts you about area four you say I'm sorry we just don't have the bandwidth and that's really hard for many people to say but for your well-being we all need to do that well that's our list of questions I wonder if any questions have come through from the audience we do have a couple questions one is to determine whether a rise in behavior is real or due to reporting how about asking on the current survey if they filled out the prior survey and finding ways to create unique anonymous identifiers in the survey and there are ways that you can do that on the backend and there are ways that you can add questions to the survey itself so that when you get your de-identified but data back from whatever the survey is you can look and see if people have participated in both you can also ask include open-ended responses that are asked people about whatever the particular behavior is now you then have to take a look at those open-ended responses which presents its own challenge but that's also a method another question was around how do you measure or evaluate the longevity of interventions that are being applied through well-being so I guess the question is trying to get at how do you look at well-being initiatives long-term even post-graduation to determine if it really endures one of my favorite research designs or assessment designs is pre post post and and we don't we often think pre post so if we're talking about assessing an intervention pausing to do the baseline and doing the pre assessment makes sense and then doing the assessment right after the lis rest as they're leaving the door as the session ends the post assessment and then looking at the difference that makes great sense if you were thinking about longevity of effect having a second post assessment six whatever time period makes sense six months next semester the end of their their academic career is a great way to think about that and if you get enough folks completing all three you have some pretty good actually research data at that point where you can look at the effects of an intervention over time so and then the other thing the other the other thought I would put out there is that is that is a great research design at the individual level but you may not need that for to get you know continuing resources from your your supervisor or from your budget officer or you may not need that to make a judgement about how effective that intervention is you may need cohort data so if you have a pretty steady understanding of this is where students start and those who participate in my set of programs and here and then then by the time they graduate they're still about there or they're a little better that's it that might be good enough and again I'm going back to the audience and purpose as important qualifiers as when you're thinking about those kinds of designs any specific ideas about what kind of data really works for administrators because I know people always have that on their minds with any personal knowledge that you can bring so the Registrar is my favorite person on campus anyone that for me anyone that I can help link back to persistence and retention so if I'm collecting individual based data if I can get persistence right to graduation and connect that back that tells a very powerful story it's a numbers game really when it comes down to it they're thinking about the dollar and they want they don't want to lose that student until they graduate and so if we can connect it back to academics and it could be termed a term graduate it could be termed a term retention it could be quarter or year to year grad persistence or could be graduation rates if your institutions struggling with graduating students so seeing them all the through the process financial aid data yeah it's another good source we hear anecdotally especially from campus rec departments all the time that their participation rates aren't quite what they want to be because students can't afford to come and do all the things or that some groups are more likely to participate than others because again of socio-economic differences so pulling financial aid data to see the extent to that's true that to which that's true is helpful students themselves are not very good reporters about socio economics so either asking concrete and specific questions like can you afford to do this can you afford to do that or looking at financial aid data is a good way to get at that we also included in the well-being assessment we have an item that asks about have you experienced socio-economic discrimination in the past year and we find that that is associated with all sorts of interesting outcomes like being far less likely to report levels of belonging and engagement and activities that we would like to see I'll go back to know your audience my my Provost at the Iowa State University of Science and Technology is an engineer so he likes data quantitative data and so knowing your audience and knowing that that's and connecting it to retention connecting it to the financial aid is very very important other folks if I'm trying to convince other folks around budgetary issues or around continuing a project or supporting a project it may be the student anecdote the anecdotal story may be the qualitative data could be the themes and so knowing your audience and knowing but knowing too that the bottom line tends to be retention to graduation for most of us or retention to the next semester for many of us that becomes really really important data if you can connect back at the individual level to the the Registrar data or the financial aid data or to the Clearing House data honestly is another place to get that if we're thinking that that large and I would also recommend looking and talking to whoever if your institution doesn't and I think most do any kind of post graduation survey upon graduation most of your students you may not even know this upon graduation they receive a survey from your institution I've always found it very interesting that folks in student affairs are not involved in that conversation about that survey since many of their hours of engagement on campus or within student affairs but finding out who does that survey and what's on the survey and getting those items and then asking if we can play with that survey a little bit and see if there's some items that you can get on there because a grad is a very powerful marketing tool to the ear institution and so if you have 90% of your graduates say X Y Z that's a very powerful message but you got to get a hold of that assessment tool in simple data presentation sometimes when we're feeling a lot of pressure to tell a really complicated or a really high stakes story we pull out the three-d bar charts that have lines and animations and all that stuff is distracting people also don't like path diagrams diagrams of your structural longitudinal cross lagged they like bar charts preferably in some kind of alphabetical order with not a ton of color those are the things that seem to work really well and I see people giggling but I have made all those mistakes yeah no more questions all right well I would like to thank our panelists for participating today all right thanks again very much appreciate our panelists today just a couple closing remarks I'm gonna free associate for a few minutes because as I was down in the audience talking to people Thursday remember to remind everybody about this from the student health insurance coalition discussions one of the the states actually has been very forward-thinking in the ships and LU of Medicaid has been Massachusetts and just some of their numbers in that state they've actually had 23,000 students enrolled in that program and the cost savings of the state was about 25 million dollars so just putting some metrics around what could be done imagine if we could get that and 49 other states Mary Hogan our chief research officer couldn't be here and so her spirit was here on this panel but I would be remiss if I didn't talk about a couple different research elements just to keep your eye on obviously the national college health assessment we had the third version of that that's rolling out in the fall of next year includes a host of new measures including resiliency there will be a component of that in there the National faculty and staff health assessment is now out in fact I was just talking to right here University that was up one of our early pilots so it would encourage you all to do that the more universities that do it the better our reference group is and and if I think is we've said you even what was I was just told asking your faculty and staff to actually do it was very powerful right and really caring about their health and wellness we also have our connected College Health Network which is the large multi-year project that acha is involved with for collecting data coming to your mailbox soon for ACH a members is something called institutional profile it's the baseline of collecting data inch between universities looking at everything from FTE to your health promoting practices please when you get it fill it out I think if we get a mass group of folks that start taking this you'll be able to get data back and compare against other organizations we will also start collecting data next year from the electronic health record systems and or start looking at comparative data so a very exciting big project but it's good to take a family to get it done and so if every University could really chip in and do that it's great and you'll you'll what do they say do well by doing good through the effort I think you know obviously as we look back to over the last two days we just had kind of a firehose of information and it's just been incredible it's been a great knowledge journey so I just want to thank again all of our panelists speakers and all of our attendees for sitting here over here or all at home or at your office kind of listening to this because I think at the end of the day what we're trying to do is we're all planting seeds right we're all germinating these seeds and I think that's the spirit of I think as dr. drew Goya said the the act of the Academy right is together is trying to figure out how do we do this and figure out what's working and what's not and grow these into real solutions on your campus when you go back home I remember somebody so tell me that when you go on airplanes the overhead baggage bins are like they suck good ideas out all right so you have all these great ideas in them as you fly back to your real life and you go and now I have to apply them and campus life kind of comes back but today I think what a couple of things you can expect first we are going to record this put it up online please share it share it with your colleagues within your institution across other universities you know this the reason why we offered it for free online was we wanted to have maximum effect you know this isn't just about this room it's about trying to share knowledge for the greater community for those of you that would we're not able to attend would like to watch again please – they will be up there online we have another of initiatives as I mentioned early on more will be coming out on those one of those other ones I haven't mentioned yet is a new website called healthy start you just at you at the end which is going to be a new website launched in 2019 it'll be a free resource for universities kind of all things health and wellness about transitioning into college and so it's kind of this idea of how do we start compiling the best information we know for students and parents and university administrators around that everything from healthy lifestyles to living with chronic diseases – yes student health insurance information additionally it encourages you please take a look at our supporting organizations who we have out there the number of nonprofit partners that were involved they do incredible work and be great have great programming as well so it encourage you to support their work finally to all you listening over the past two days online and here in this room I just want to thank you for what you do you cannot possibly get enough thanks from our students from our communities and I certainly want to offer acha sincerest thanks to all of you for the hard work that you do every day and making the difference in the lives of our college students I totally continue your innovation in your hard work and please share back your results and I think that's kind of what the whole purpose of these kinds of events are with that we'll go ahead and conclude this summit and I wish everyone's safe travels back home if you are going to hang with us for the 1:30 kickoff start for healthy campus that will be in this room and otherwise wish everyone a very safe travels back and thank you very much [Applause]

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