The Only Video You’ll Ever Need to Watch About Gluten

The Only Video You’ll Ever Need to Watch About Gluten


So you’re binge-watching the Great British
Bake-Off and you see this. And
then you open twitter and you see this. So what gives? Is gluten good, or is gluten bad? Do you want it in your food, or don’t you? If you KNEAD an explanation, we’ve got your
PROOF right here. Gluten isn’t a monster that hides in your
bread. It’s a form of protein you can find in wheat
and its closest relatives. These “wheat-adjacent” grains have stuff
similar to gluten that we sometimes call gluten as an umbrella term, and these OTHER grains
are gluten-free. Gluteny proteins store energy to help baby
wheat plants grow up big and strong, if we didn’t grind it into flour and eat it first. In wheat, gluten is made up of glutenin and
gliadin. Gliadin is stretchy, while glutenin is strong
and snaps easily back into place. Like all proteins, glutenin and gliadin are
made of amino acids, some of which contain sulfur. Sulfur atoms passing by each other can form
covalent bonds which link individual protein chains together. A stretchy and tough mesh starts to form when
water is added to the flour. And because I have daydreams about being the
next Mary Berry, I made some bread to show you on a less molecular scale. Here you can see the glutenin and gliadin
mesh that’s formed. Those criss-crosses in the dough are thanks
to gluten. So why is gluten so special to bakers? Well, because that protein mesh is important
in the weird, alchemical transformation of this, to this, to this. The yeast in bread dough produces carbon dioxide
gas, which gets trapped in gluten’s net, making the dough rise. Without enough gluten, the bread could turn
out tough and dense. When bakers and us Mary Berry wannabes hold
a bit of dough up to a light, they’re looking to see if they can stretch it thin enough
to see through it without it tearing. If they can, they know the dough has developed
enough gluten. Here is ours not ready, still not ready, and
finally…yeah I’m done kneading. So if gluten makes bread well, bready, why
do people insist on going gluten free? Is gluten bad for people? No. For most people, it’s totally fine. And if you put raisins in, it’s healthy! They’re fruit… But there are a small number of specific medical
cases where gluten free may be helpful. The first case is celiac disease. It’s a serious medical condition that might
affect as many as 1 in 100 people in the US, depending where your genes are from. People with celiac can’t handle gluten from
wheat  and when they eat it, their immune system freaks out and can send the person
running to the bathroom. Celiac can cause long-term digestive harm
and can prevent people from getting the nutrients they need. People with celiac can try to eliminate as
much gluten as possible, but trace amounts of the stuff show up everywhere, even in lip
balm. The second case is wheat allergies, which
are more common in children. People usually outgrow wheat allergies by
age 6 or so, but those allergies can cause nasty reactions. Then there’s non-Celiac gluten sensitivity. This condition affects people differently
and doctors are still agreeing on how to define it. It’s all pretty up in the air right now,
but some people feel better after they cut gluten from their diet. If you haven’t been told by a doctor that
you have a gluten problem, you probably don’t need to worry about gluten just because it’s
trendy to do so. In the end gluten is a protein that we digest
for energy. Protein that happens to work a bit of magic
in the oven to make lovely chewy bread… The bread turned out great, by the way. We’ll toss the recipe in the video description. Thanks for watching, and don’t forget to
subscribe. We’ll be leaven-ing now [BOO] so we’ll
see ya next time.

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37 thoughts on “The Only Video You’ll Ever Need to Watch About Gluten

  1. Wanna know more about how Celiac and gluten sensitivity affects people? Or how about more food science. Let us know. PS In case you missed it, we put the link to the bread recipe in the description. It turned out pretty freaking good.

  2. Any thoughts in the so called "rise in gluten sensitivity" or increasing cases in inflammation diseases like Celiac's? I want to think most are people self-diagnosing incorrectly, but I wonder if cheap factory bread is messing with our microbiomes or something.

  3. I'm skeptical about the gluten sensitivity that it's not celiac disease. I've never found reputable studies that seen to confirm it exists and the few people I know who claim to have it shifted to a much healthier diet all together like eating more fruits and vegetables while cutting baked goods and fast food completely. I guess if believing that it's the gluten helps you get healthier it's okay but I'd like to see some scientific consensus on the matter.

  4. Pharma' adds WGA =wheat germ agglutinin to vaccines as an adjuvant. I think this is the cause of the rise of sensitivity, allergies, etc. Google together: WGA and vaccine

  5. NCGS could actually have more to do with ATIs, proteines that keep your digestive enzymes from working properly (which are found in grains that also contain gluten, funny enough). In combination with gluten the effects are most severe. So it's rather NCWS (non celiac wheat sensitivity). But it doesn't make that much of a difference, go gluten free and you'll be fine.

    By the way, you can get this from eating waaaaay too much grains, it seems. I'm sure that's why I have it.
    BUT DON'T SIMPLY TRUST A DOCTOR ON THIS, THEY HAVE NO IDEA
    I've had symptoms for more than ten years, and all they gave me were gut bacteria and detox-stuff. I went to many different doctors, but in the end I found out myself, and I am finally able to eat without excruciating pain. Yay.

  6. There is plenty wrong with gluten. No thanks!

    https://www.drperlmutter.com/about/grain-brain-by-david-perlmutter/

    BTW: Im unsubscribing to this channel now, so any replies to this comment will be ignored. Good day.

  7. Gluten is bad for you even if you don't have celiac. It's shown to decrease nutrition partitioning in most humans. Jussayin!

  8. Good video on the subject, yes Gluten is ok for most people ( I love my bread ) but even though I have no problem with it, does not mean that others may not. bottom line is, if people feel better removing gluten from their diet, it does not matter if they have a real medical condition, or not, it's their choice.

  9. In the breeding of wheat to produce larger kernels, they also produced wheat with about 20 times the gluten than past wheat. A small amount of gluten is harmless, but a large amount can actually scrape the inner lining of the intestine and cause leakage of e-coli outside of the intestine. And of course we all know that e-coli outside the intestine is very dangerous.

  10. So this video is promoting dried fruits and saying gluten doesn't even cause constipation and gas for most people? What a useless video. Yes a lot of people are fine with gluten but they won't realize they weren't fine because they get used to gluten-related issues. A lot of people get used to gas and diarrhea and other digestive problems but they don't know that gluten maybe to blame. While it does mention some gluten issues it makes it seem like it is not a big deal. More people suffer from gluten related issues than you think.

  11. As a celiac, I have no problem with the gluten-free fad…it has helped make many more GF food options available for us, and also greatly increased public awareness of gluten intolerance!

  12. You should have said cysteine bonds instead of using the word 'sulfur'. People are going to freak out about that now… 🙄

    Great video though!

  13. Yeah… Non-celiac gluten sensitivity sounds like placebo to me. But it being placebo doesn't make it not real, some people still feel better without gluten, so who am I to get in the way of that?

  14. I think I've seen an online lecture on gluten where they said that gluten contributes actively to the body fat forming. If this is true, would it still be ok to say that it's objectively not bad?

  15. I've been wondering if my fiance has celiac or non-celiac gluten sensitivity for a while. even trace amounts will make him super ill for up to a day so I'm guessing it's celiac, but what's weird is it didn't start getting super bad til he was a teen

  16. yes, DO worry about gluten, that makes companies make more gluten free stuff and me, who has celiac disease, has a much easier time getting non-gluten alternatives to everyday foods =P the somewhat recent trend with people cutting down on or removing gluten from their food has made the selection on the"gluten free" isle in my local groceries store quadruple over the last 4-5 years =)

  17. The video says that gluten is a protein that we digest. Wrong. It is basically indigestible and passes through you and you may be able to tolerate it — that is not have an autoimmune or other harmful reaction. But as a nutrient it is worthless.

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